Monthly Archives: November 2019

Being an expert: traveling the same road again and again

There are several reasons for the slow adoption of crowdsourcing as a practical problem-solving tool. One of them is the lack of trust in the intellectual power of the crowd, its ability to tackle complex problems. Almost everyone would agree … Continue reading

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“Fail often” but not too often

“Failing fast and often” has become an innovation mantra. Of course, not everyone takes this wisdom at face value. Even more tellingly, no one has taken the trouble to explain what “fast” and “often” precisely mean when applied to failure. … Continue reading

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Crowdsourcing: two approaches, two objectives

In my previous post, I reminded the original definition of crowdsourcing by Jeff Howe: “the act of taking a job traditionally performed by a designated agent (usually an employee) and outsourcing it to an undefined, generally large group of people … Continue reading

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What is crowdsourcing?

In recent years, crowdsourcing has become a popular topic in business publications and social media. Yet, its acceptance as a practical problem-solving tool has been slow. Why? Because there is a widespread, often completely paralyzing, uncertainty over what crowdsourcing is … Continue reading

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