Tag Archives: Open Innovation

Crowdsourcing: two approaches, two objectives

In my previous post, I reminded the original definition of crowdsourcing by Jeff Howe: “the act of taking a job traditionally performed by a designated agent (usually an employee) and outsourcing it to an undefined, generally large group of people … Continue reading

Posted in Crowdsourcing, Innovation | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

What is crowdsourcing?

In recent years, crowdsourcing has become a popular topic in business publications and social media. Yet, its acceptance as a practical problem-solving tool has been slow. Why? Because there is a widespread, often completely paralyzing, uncertainty over what crowdsourcing is … Continue reading

Posted in Crowdsourcing, Innovation | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Is your shovel good enough to hit the nail?

Imagine you’re outside and need to hit the nail into the wall to hang a picture. You select the nail of the correct size and then look around for an appropriate hitting tool. You pick up a new, shiny shovel … Continue reading

Posted in Crowdsourcing, Innovation | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A confession of open innovation manager

Over the years, I’ve worked with many companies that tried to apply open innovation approaches to solving their problems. Some of them have succeeded, some have failed—with the rest falling in between. But there was one common feature that all … Continue reading

Posted in Innovation | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

We’ll get back to you. Or not.

During my time at InnoCentive, there was a job I and my colleagues hated the most: collecting clients’ feedback to contributions by the members of the InnoCentive crowd. The clients would post a problem to the InnoCentive website, and a … Continue reading

Posted in Crowdsourcing | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Crowdsourcing “in reverse”: asking crowds to ask questions

It’s important to understand that crowdsourcing is first and foremost a question, a question that you ask a large and, ideally, diversified crowd of people. And for as long as it’s well-thought-out, properly defined, and clearly articulated, it doesn’t really matter … Continue reading

Posted in Crowdsourcing, Health Care | Tagged , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Crowdsourcing 2.0

I like to argue, only half-jokingly, that crowdsourcing is very simple. It consists of only two components: a question and a crowd—a question that you present to a crowd and a crowd that you assemble to answer this question. And … Continue reading

Posted in Crowdsourcing | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment